New York Times: Criminal investigation awaits bin Salman at the G20 summit

The US newspaper quoted officials in the Argentine authorities as saying that prosecutors were investigating Bin Salman's murder of war crimes in Yemen and accusing him of Khashoggi's murder.

New York Times: Criminal investigation awaits bin Salman at the G20 summit

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Prosecutors in Argentina are considering charges against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman over his country's war in Yemen and the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in his Turkish consulate in Istanbul, during his forthcoming participation in the 20th Summit, to be held in Buenos Aires next Friday.


The US newspaper quoted officials in the Argentine authorities as saying that prosecutors were investigating Bin Salman's murder of war crimes in Yemen and accusing him of Khashoggi's murder.


"The investigation will include cases of torture in Saudi prisons and was initiated after a complaint from Human Rights Watch, which is still in its early stages," she said.


She expected no arrest warrant against Bin Salman before the G20, and he would be protected from any arrest because of his diplomatic immunity, but would spoil his efforts to show himself among world leaders after the assassination of Khashoggi.


And believes that the Argentine investigations will make Bin Salman retreat from attending the next summit, which means impeding his movement and effectiveness.


Last week, US President Donald Trump rejected the US intelligence agency's conclusion that Bin Laden was responsible for Khashoggi's assassination. "He may have been aware of the murder," he said.


The "New York Times": "The move of prosecutors in Argentina threatens to attend the summit, which wants to achieve Bin Salman, where he is expected to meet with a number of Western leaders and also President Trump."


Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, said bin Salman should know there was a criminal investigation he would face if he entered Argentina.


Argentine law is exceptionally favorable on international human rights issues because of the heavy legacy of the country's transition from the military dictatorship that lasted from 1976 to 1983, when some 30,000 people were killed and disappeared.


At the beginning of the first decade of the twentieth century, Argentina abolished special immunity and many people were accused of human rights violations under military rule.

 

Source: Maan Agency